Ultimate Guide To Video Marketing

Video Marketing Guide

One thing every brand needs is a video marketing strategy, this concept isn’t anything new, however the importance of it has increased substantially and become much more important for every channel.

No longer is this just one piece of your overall marketing plan. It is a central part of your outreach strategy and campaigns efforts, especially when it comes to your social media strategy.

Video has began absolutely dominating social media, in fact according to a recent survey four of the top six channels on which viewers watch videos are social media channels. Recently a Facebook executive predicted that the platform will be all video within five years.

Now you may be asking yourself “why is this important?” The answer being that if you’re not creating video at this point it’s likely that you are quickly falling behind. Simpler and more raw videos tend to come across as more authentic, which is what matters to most viewers.

On the bright side videos are more cost efficient than ever, nowadays all it takes is a smartphone to shoot a high quality 4k video.

However while it may be easier and cheaper than ever, video can still come across as complicated, what with all the camera and lighting equipment on the market. This is precisely the reason that this guide was created, continue reading for an in-depth look at video marketing strategy.

Why You Should Focus On Video Marketing In 2019.

In 2016 video began to rise in popularity, and by 2017 it had risen to the top of the marketing tactic list.

As of 2018 video marketing has evolved from a singular marketing tactic into an entire business strategy.

As a tactic, there is a good chance that your creative team was focused on a one-to-many awareness play, with a lot of focus on expensive production, and with little analysis to show for it.

As a strategy on the other hand video is quite different, being produced by all teams equally instead of just one, in a conversational, actionable, and measurable way. As a strategy it’s safe to say that video is the future.

More than 50% of consumers want to see videos from brands more than any other type of content.

Video isn’t just limited to entertainment, videos on landing pages are capable of increasing conversion rates by 80%. The mere mention of video in your email subject line will increase opening rates by nearly 20%, 90% of consumers also say that videos help them with purchasing decisions.

Video has changed more than just how businesses market and consumers shop, its also transformed how salespeople connect with and convert prospects as well as how services teams support and delight customers. In other words video is a viable outlet throughout all marketing strategies.

The Twelve Types Of Video Marketing.

1. Brand Videos.

Often created as part of a larger advertising campaign, showcasing the company’s high level vision, mission, or products and services. The purpose behind these videos is to build your company’s awareness and to intrigue and attract your target audience.

2. Expert Interviews

If you can get interviews with internal experts or thought leaders in your field and capture them in a video, it’s a great way to build trust and authority with your target audience. Find the influencers in your field and whether or not they share your views get their discussions on video, to share with your audience.

3. Explainer Videos.

Used to help your customer better understand why they need your product or service, many explainer videos will take the viewer on a fictional journey in which the buyer is facing a certain problem, this problem is then solved thanks to the companies product or solution.

4. Case Study And Customer Testimonial Videos.

Prospects want to know that your product can and will solve their consumer related problems. One of the best ways to show this is with a case study related video that shows testimony from a valued and loyal customer. These people are your best advocates, so get them in front of a camera and let them describe their problems and how your product helped them.

5. 360 Degree & Virtual Reality.

360 Degree videos allow viewers to scroll around seeing your content from all possible angles as though they were actually there, which helps your viewers feel like they are actually at an event or location. Virtual reality allows users to control and navigate their own experience.

6. Personalized Messages.

Video is great way to continue a conversation, or respond to someone via email, simply record a personal message maybe recapping a missed meeting or answering asked questions and then send these to your prospects.

7. Demo Videos.

These videos are used to showcase how your product works, whether it’s through taking users on a visual tour or your software and how to use it, or unboxing and showing a physical product.

8. Event Videos.

If your company holds conferences, round table discussions, fundraisers, or other events you can utilize videos to release a highlight reel, or presentations and interesting interviews from the event.

9. Educational Or How-To Videos.

Instructional videos are a great way to teach your audience something new, and build the knowledge that they’ll need to understand your business and solutions. These videos can also be useful to your sales and service teams as they work with customers.

10. Animated Videos.

A great way to explain hard to grasp concepts animated videos can be used when strong visuals are needed, or when you need to explain an abstract service or product.

11. Live Videos.

A live video will give your viewers a special behind the scenes look at your company. Drawing longer streams and higher engagement rates, viewers tend to spend up to 8x longer with live video than with video on demand. Utilize live streaming with presentations, interviews, and events while encouraging your viewers to ask questions.

12. Augmented Reality Videos.

This style of video allows you to add a digital layer to what you are viewing in the real world, such as pointing your phone’s camera at the wall of your living room and the video showing you what a specific couch would look like in that location.

Video Creation Process.

Before you set up, record, or edit anything, start with a conversation about the purpose of your video. You may ask why? The answer being that every decision made during the video creation process will point back to your video’s purpose and the action you would like your audience to complete after watching it.

Also without a clear purpose agreed upon by your team, you could find yourself stuck in a whirlwind of re-shooting, re-framing, editing… and generally just wasting a large amount of time.

There are a lot of people involved when making videos so you may wonder how you can ensure that they are all aligned.

Start by creating a questionnaire and passing it along to the stakeholders of the project. This will allow you to ask everyone the same questions and compile their answers in front of you for easy understanding. Try these questions to start.

* Who’s your target audience?

What is the buyer persona that you’re targeting? This may be a segment of your company’s typical buyer persona.

* What’s the goal?

Are you trying to increase brand awareness? Sell more event tickets? Launch a new product? Basically what is it that you want your audience to do after watching the video.

* Where’s the video going to live?

Facebook? Behind a landing page form? To start with you should choose just one target location, somewhere you’re sure that your target audience will discover the video, later you can change it to fit other channels.

* When’s it due?

You should always start with a timeline. A video that has a few months to work on will have a very different budget and creative scope when compared to one that only has a couple days.

* What’s the budget?

Video can get very expensive, but that doesn’t mean it has to be. Set a budget, do your research and set realistic parameters.

* What are the creative requirements?

With your budget, skills, and resources in mind think about what creative roadblocks may arise. Maybe you need a designer to create lower third graphics? Think are you going to be making an animated or live videos.

* What will constitute success for the video?

It’s a good idea to choose several key performance indicators that correspond with your video’s goals.

Step 1. Scripting Your Video

There are times that videos can be completely unscripted, but business videos are not that time. If you skip this important first step you will find yourself editing more than you should need to, or releasing a video that is much longer than need be, and possibly losing your audience along the way.

Start writing your script the same way you would a blog post, create an outline, list out your key points and order them logically.

Google docs is a great tool to use to promote collaboration and real-time commenting. Use the “Insert > Table” function to adopt one of television’s traditional script writing practices, the two column script. Try writing your audio (script) in the left column and insert matching visual ideas in the right.

Make sure your viewer doesn’t have to stick around to the end of your video to understand it’s purpose. There is a good chance that they won’t make it that far. In the same way you would in journalistic writing it’s important to insert a hook early on in your video that states the purpose, this is especially important for educational or explainer videos.

As you begin creating videos you’ll notice that there is a distinct between scripts and your typical business blog post. Language… video language should be relaxed, clear, and conversational. Avoid more complex sentence structures and eloquent clauses. Instead connect with your audience by writing in first person and using visual language.

Majority of video scripts are short, much shorter than you might expect. Keep a script timer handy to check your script length as you write and edit. A good rule of thumb is that 350 words equates to just about two minutes of video length.

When words are on paper they sound quite a bit different from when they are read aloud. That is why it is important to organize a table read of your script before filming. The point of this is to smooth out the kinks of your script and nail down inflection points.

Have a few people gather around a table with their laptops, including both your writers and talent, and read through the script multiple times. If a line is accidentally said in a different way then the script prescribes, think about why and consider changing the line to make it sound more natural.

Step 2. Understanding Your Camera.

It happens a bit too often, times at which fear and uncertainty regarding the type of equipment you should use will keep companies from trying out video marketing completely. However learning how to shoot videos doesn’t have to be overwhelming.

Chances are that you have a great easy to use camera in your pocket: the iPhone.

Shooting With Your iPhone.

Before you start filming with your iPhone, ensure that your device has enough storage. Also it’s a good idea to turn on your phone’s do not disturb feature in order to avoid distracting notifications while filming.

Once you turn on your iPhone’s camera, be sure to flip it horizontally this will ensure the best possible viewing experience. Keep in mind that you also want to move close enough to your target so you can avoid using the zoom feature as it will often make the final product look pixelated and blurry.

Your iPhone may do a great job of focusing on the subject when you take photos, but when taking video it could continually adjust and readjust as you move around the scene. To solve this issue you will need to lock the exposure before pressing record. To do this you need to press and hold your finger down on the subject of the video until a yellow box with the words AE/AF lock appear.

Shooting With Prosumer And Professional Cameras.

With iPhones the advantages are clear they’re great for filming on the fly and becoming acclimated with video. At some point however you may feel like it’s time for an upgrade. With the sheer amount of digital cameras on the market, it may feel like there are too many choices to pick from. With this purpose in mind we’ve identified a few options in the hopes of simplifying your search.

The first choice you’ll need to make is whether you want a prosumer camera or a professional camera.

Prosumer Cameras.

Often considered the bridge between basic compact cameras and more advanced cameras. These tend to be perfect for those that are interested in creating more video but want the option to just press record. Most of these have a fixed lens to keep things simple.

Professional Cameras.

Cameras such as DSLRs will fall into this category, these will give you a more defined control over the manual settings of shooting video and allow you to achieve the shallow depth of field that people rave about. While they are primarily used for photography, DSLRs are incredibly small, work great in low light, and pair with a wide range of lenses, making these perfect for video.

These do however require some training, and additional purchases to fully grasp their potential.

Understanding Your Camera’s Manual Settings.

If you decide to go the DSLR route there are a few settings that you will need to understand before your first shoot: frame rate, shutter speed, ISO, aperture, and color balance.

As you read on it may be beneficial to keep your camera nearby, after all most of these settings can seem quite abstract without testing them for yourself.

Before we begin we need to stress that this is a high-level overview of each setting. If you find that you want to learn even more, then try diving in and doing your own research. There is plenty to learn about how to manipulate these settings and use them together in order to create different looks.

Keep in mind that the method to adjust these settings will differ with each brand, be sure that you consult your instruction manual to be sure how to do so.

Frame Rate.


There are as many customization options are there are video concepts, but the most basic option when it comes to frame rate is shooting your video at 24fps or 30fps.

24fps is often credited by experts to have a more cinematic look to it, while 30fps is more common, especially when it comes to videos that need to be projected or broadcast.

A good rule to follow is to just ask the end user of your video what their preferences might be and shoot based on that. Be sure to keep your resolution at least at 1920 x 1080 in order to maintain quality of footage.

Aperture.

After you’ve set your frame rate and resolution in your camera’s settings it’ll be time to determine your aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Be sure that you turn your camera to manual mode in order to control these settings.

While we will go over each of these settings separately keep in mind that they are meant to go in tandem.

The aperture refers to the size of the opening in the lens. Similar to a human eye a lens will open and close to control the amount of light reaching the sensor. Aperture is measured in what is referred to as an f-stop. The smaller the f-stop number the more open the lens is, while a larger number would mean that the lens is more open.

The more light that comes into your camera, and therefore the lower the f-stop number, the brighter the image and more shallow the depth of field. This is great when you want your subject to stand out against it’s background. On the opposite side, the less light that comes into the camera the higher the f-stop number, resulting in a deep depth of field, which allows you to maintain greater focus across a larger portion of your frame.

Shutter Speed.

If you want to understand shutter speed first we’ll need to talk about photography. When taking a photo, shutter speed refers to the length of time that the camera’s sensor is exposed to light. You can think of it as how quickly or slowly that the camera blinks.

If you’ve seen a picture of a hummingbird seemingly frozen in air, this would be an example of very fast shutter speed, on the other hand an image of a rushing river with the water blurring together was likely taken with a slow shutter speed.

Shutter speed in measured in seconds, or more accurately fractions of seconds. The greater the denominator of the fraction is, the faster the shutter speed. Basically meaning that 1/1000 would be faster than 1/30.

You may be wondering what this all means when it comes to video? We don’t want to get in to deep of an explanation, but if you want to pick an adequate setting you’ll need to do a little math. Start with multiplying your frame rate by 2, so if you’re shooting in the before mentioned 24fps that would make it 48. This number will them become the denominator of your shutter speed fraction.

However shutter speed is only available in a few increments, meaning your need to round that 1/48 up to the next closest setting 1/50. Here are a few common shutter speeds and how to calculate them.

* At 24fps, 24×2=48, equaling a shutter speed of 1/50.

* At 30fps, 30×2=60, equaling a shutter speed of 1/60.

* At 60fps, 60×2=120, equaling a shutter speed of 1/20.

This is just a guideline for choosing shutter speed, and while a traditionalist would stick to these calculations there is always room to tweak shutter speed slightly in order to achieve a desired affect. When it comes to video, rules can be broken, just make sure that you have a good enough reason to do so.

ISO.


The final key element of your manual settings ISO measures the camera sensor’s sensitivity to light. On your camera, you’ll see the settings referred to in numbers in either the hundreds or thousands.

The higher this number the more sensitive your camera is to light, and likewise the lower the number the less sensitive. ISO also affects the graininess of the image. Low ISOs produce a crisp shot, while high ISOs create a more noisy, grainy shot.

When you’re choosing an ISO, you would do best to consider the lighting. If your subject is well-lit you can get by with a lower ISO, ideally around 100 or 200. However in a low light situation you’ll need to bump up the ISO, just be careful of how grainy it makes your shot.

If you’re just starting out with the manual video settings, don’t be overwhelmed. Understanding the ins and outs can take a lot of practice and time. Try out these tips to stay ahead of the learning curve.

* Start With Photos.

When you switch your camera off video mode, you’ll be able to see the relationship between aperture, ISO, and shutter speed. Take a huge amount of photos and change the settings a little at a time. After awhile the numbers will be less and less intimidating and switching between settings will make more sense, as well as becoming easier to apply to video.

* Form A Process.

All videographers have their own methods, but to start we suggest setting your shutter speed first according to the math above. Then adjust the aperture depending on the depth that you want to achieve. Then, ISO. After all this circle back to the shutter speed for any fine adjustments.

White Balance.


Aperture, shutter speed, and ISO may be the three main pillars of manual photography and videography, there is another piece to the puzzle that is just as important, white balance.

What white balance does is it tells your camera the color temperature of the environment you’re shooting in. Different types of light have different colors. For example, incandescent bulbs have a very warm color. While florescent bulbs are a little cooler, and daylight is even cooler than that. Before you start shooting you have to adjust your camera’s white balance according to your setup.

The exact settings on your camera will depend on your model, but it’s likely that there will be an auto option, a bunch of presets, and custom. Avoid the auto setting at all costs and opt for either a preset or ideally custom. If you have a top of the line DSLR, there may also be an option to manually set the color temperature of the room, measured in Kelvin.

Focus.

Focus may not be one of the key settings of shooting, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t important to keep in mind. With a DSLR, you have the option to shoot using auto-focus or manual focus. It changes depending on the kind of camera you’re using, but for the most part auto-focus is not the most accurate.

Instead flip your lens to manual focus. Use the (+) and (-) buttons to enlarge the viewfinder and move in close to your subject’s face. Then, adjust the focus on the lens. For shooting a stationary setup like an interview, make sure that the subject’s eyelashes are in focus, this way you can be sure that your footage is clear and sharp.

Step 3. Setting Up A Studio.

Once you begin to set up an in-office studio, you’ll notice that the purchases will add up quite quickly. Not only do you have to buy a camera, but you’ll also need tripods, lights, microphones, and more.

Stay calm though, with a little bit of know-how, building your own studio doesn’t have to be overwhelming. There are plenty of cost effective choices and DIY hacks to ensure that your videos look top quality.

Basic Equipment.

Let me stress that you should always shoot using a tripod, it goes without saying that the handheld method you use for your Snapchat story won’t work here. Tripods allow you to always maintain a steady shot while minimizing the chance of breaking your expensive equipment.

The price of tripods varies to a rather tremendous degree, the quality of tripod you invest in should depend on the level of camera and lens you have. If you’re shooting with a phone you can get by with a table mount such as the Arkon Tripod Mount or a full-size tripod like the Acuvar 50” Aluminum Tripod. If you have a DSLR then Manfrotto makes a variety of trustworthy tripods increasing incrementally in price as well as quality.

Be sure that once you have your tripod you also stock up on camera batteries and SD cards, after all recording will cause you to run through both much quicker than when taking photos.

Audio Equipment.



After you’ve spent some time testing out you’re camera’s video capabilities you’ll have noticed that it has an internal microphone for recording video… Don’t Use It.

If you set up your camera a reasonable distance from you’re target you’ll notice that the built in microphone isn’t nearly powerful enough to adequately record your audio. Instead it’s time you invest in a few quality pieces of sound equipment.

If you’re using your iPhone there are a ton of microphone options to choose from that are both easy to use and affordable.

Opinions vary greatly among on the best method and equipment for recording audio with a DSLR. You’ve likely seen many videos that feature talent fitted with lavalier microphones, these are the small microphones that clip to your collar and they come with both wired and wireless options. However they can be a little bit obtrusive both for the talent who has to wear them, and the viewer who can see them.

However if you’re recording in a controlled environment I suggest using a shotgun mic, they’re reliable, remain out of the shot, and record background noise in a natural way.

Creating a shotgun mic setup isn’t difficult either, you’ll need a shotgun mic to start with such as the Sennheiser ME66, a shotgun clip, light stand, XLR cable, and Zoom H4N recorder. The Zoom recorder allows you to record audio separately on an SD card and adjust the gain for the environment you’re shooting in.

Now obviously these purchases add up quickly, but a shotgun mic setup is not only reliable but also will last for years to come. However if you’re looking for a more affordable solution, you should look into the Rode VideoMic that mounts on top of your DSLR and plugs right into the camera body.

Lighting Equipment.

Now that you have a camera and you’re audio, it’s time to talk about lighting.

If you want to outfit your studio without breaking the bank, you’ll need to head over to your local home improvement store. Pick up some extension cords and a few clamp lights with bulbs, you’ll also need three light stands, which are available on Amazon.

The most traditional setup for lighting is called three-point lighting, as you could probably guess it involves three lights set up strategically around the subject, wrapping them in light and creating appealing shadows on their faces.

The first thing you’ll need is a key light. Place this at a 45-degree angle to the left or right of the subject. Lift the light above their head and aim it downwards. This is the most important light and should be bright enough that it could be the only light used, if it had to be.

Next, place the fill light also at a 45-degree angle on the opposite side and lift it close to or just above eye level. The purpose of this light is to soften the shadows created by the key, without getting rid of them completely. This means that your fill light should be kept dimmer than the key light. If you have to use the same type of light for both, move the fill light back further and diffuse it by clipping a clear shower curtain on the clamp light with clothes pins.

The final light is known as the back-light and will add a third layer of dimension. Scoot your subject away from the background. Lift a light above the subject’s head and place it behind them and off to the side so it’s out of the frame. This light should be pointed at the back of their head, creating a subtle rim of light, separating them from the background.

Setting Up Your In-Office Studio.

Once you have all of your equipment ready to go, you’ll finally be able to build your office studio. While you could grab a closet to store your equipment in, I recommend going a bit bigger and claiming a conference room.

The benefit of having a designated studio, is that you’ll save a lot of time usually spent with prep. Just make sure the conference room isn’t too empty, if you need to don’t be afraid to bring in some chairs, a couch, or some blankets to help minimize the echoes in the room.

While we’re on the subject of sound, pay special attention to the hum of the air conditioning. Try to find a room with as little noise as you can, or turn down the fan during recording. You may also consider the purchase of photography paper in order to create a background that is more appealing than a blank conference room wall.

Once it’s finally time to shoot, clear out any unnecessary people from the room and turn off the overhead lights. With the correct lighting setup those harsh fluorescent lights would just interfere. After everything has been set up you can call in your talent. Make sure you wait till everything is ready though, there’s nothing worse than being nervous, and then having to anxiously watch as lights are turned on and the camera is tested.

Step 4. Preparing Your Talent.

If you already have experienced, confident actors in your company, consider yourself lucky. Video talent is a rare resource. However with just a little bit of coaching, you can help your teammates thrive in front of the camera.

It doesn’t matter if it’s your first video or your fiftieth, remember getting in front of a camera is scary. Schedule enough time to give your talent the script early, but make it clear they needn’t memorize it.

Instead, place a laptop below the eye-line of the camera. Break the script into short paragraphs and record it section by section until you capture a great take of each. If you plan in advance when the final video will show B-roll, you can have your talent read the lines directly like a voice over.

There is more to your job than just pressing record during the shoot, you are also a coach. Balance critical feedback with support and be quick to offer encouragement after each take. This is why it’s important to conduct a table read during the scripting process: It’s easier to give feedback when there’s not a camera in the room. Remember that you don’t need to be serious all the time, in fact being a bit silly during a shoot can help your talent relax, this will help keep your final product from coming off stiff.

However, while you need to maintain a level of fun on set you also must remain vigilant. It’s part of your job to pay attention to the little details, like making sure all the mics are on, or noticing if the lighting changes. Record each section multiple times and let your talent experiment with different inflections. Once you feel that you’ve nailed the shot… get another. At this point you’re talent will be on a roll and options will help tremendously during the editing process.

After you’ve reached the end of your script circle back to the beginning. There is a good chance that your talent has become much more comfortable throughout the shoot. The beginning of the video is often the most crucial, so recording that section again when they’re feeling the most confident is a good idea.

Composition Basics.

Sometimes a film is simply beautiful, it isn’t the story or the picturesque setting that makes it this way either. In truth, the scene may take place in the dingiest of sets, but that doesn’t change that the shot just feels right.

This is the power of composition. When objects appear where they should in the frame, the quality of your video increases exponentially.

When it comes to video the rules of composition are similar to what you may have learned in photography or art class. The first thing to do is consider the rule of thirds, this is the idea that you can create a sense of balance by imagining the canvas with two horizontal lines and two vertical lines. Key elements should occur at the intersection of these lines.

An example of this would be when you are shooting an interview or how-to video, in this case the subject’s eyes should align with the top horizontal line near one of the two intersections. For this “Talking Head” shot you can improve your composition by leaving enough head room, which is the empty space above the subjects head.

Including a B-roll in you video is one of the best ways to improve its look. B-roll is supplementary footage included as a cutaway. This can include shots of a customer service rep talking on the phone, a designer editing your website, visuals of your office, or screenshots of your products. The key part of a b-roll is to ensure that each piece of it enhances the story.

When collecting b-roll, include a mix of shots from varying angles and distances. In fact, film professionals use different names to describe these variations.

* Establishing Shots.

These are wide shots that allow the viewer to see the entire scene. They are great to use when introducing the scene at the beginning of a video.

* Medium Shots.

Tighter shots that focus on the subject or a portion of the scene. A classic interview shot would fall under medium shots.

* Close Ups.

Tightly cropped shots that zoom in to show detail. These may feature something like someone’s hands typing on a computer, or pouring a cup of coffee.

To practice try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. Maybe have your subject open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, and begin typing on their computer. This ten second shot may not seem like much, but it might consist of as many as six or more different b-roll clips.

This brings us into the final lesson of composition, continuity. Continuity is the process of combining shots into a sequence so that they appear to be happening at the same time and place. A key part of continuity is making sure any ancillary objects in the shot stay in the same place throughout any number of shots that may be taken.

The other part of learning continuity is match on action. For the scene described above you’d want to record the subject opening the door and walking in from both inside and outside of the office. Then in post-production you could flip between the scenes at the exact right time to make the cut seamless.

Step 5. Shooting For The Edit.

With video it’s important to remember that there are two sides shooting and editing, and some are better at one than the other. Whichever side your best at, it’s still worth understanding the process and pain each point entails.

For example, as the person behind the camera you may feel that you have collected ample footage and asked all the right questions. On the other side though, the editor may feel that you shot to much of one scene and not enough of others, making their job harder.

Filmmakers teach a valuable lesson regarding this: shoot for the edit. By keeping in mind that the footage you record will be edited later on you can make smarter decisions and save countless hours in the editing room.

The first thing you’ll want to remember when you shoot for the edit is to leave a buffer in the beginning and end of each clip. These are called handles and can save editors from the headache of cutting too close to an important shot.

In the section for preparing talent, we already discussed how to record your script in short sections. When the editor goes to stitch these shots together side-by-side, the subject’s face and hands might switch abruptly between clips. This is known as a jump cut, and for editors, it poses an interesting challenge. This is where the b-roll comes in, to help mask these jump cuts.

As a producer it’s your job to capture plenty of b-roll to make sure your editor never runs out. Create a shot list of more b-roll ideas than you think you’ll need and mark them off as you record them.

To help mask jump cuts you could also shoot with two cameras, this is especially helpful if you’re shooting an interview without a script. Camera A would be the traditional, straight on shot. Camera B should be angled 30 to 45-degrees to the side and capture a distinctly different shot. The editor can then flip between these two views making the transition seem more natural.

When shooting with two cameras your editor will need to sync the footage between the separate views. To help them do this clap your hands loudly in front of the cameras just before you ask the first interview question. This works the same way as an old fashioned clapboard, and while modern editing software has auto-sync features this will help you initially line up the clips.

Finally it’s a good idea to mark your good clips. Even with scripted videos you may need to record the same section ten or more times. A good way to mark them is once your subject nails a take, wave your hand in front of the lens. This way the editor can scrub directly to this visual cue and save time on footage review.

Step 6. Organizing Footage.

There is no doubt that file organization is boring, but when it comes to video editing it might just save your project.

When capturing video you have to take a hard look at your computer and file organization habits. If you’re the kind of person who works off of a cluttered desktop, you’ll find yourself in a world of hurt.

First thing to keep in mind is that video files are incredibly large. This means it’s unlikely that you would want to store any of them on your computers internal hard drive. After all you’ll quickly run out of storage space, and your computer’s processing speed will begin to lag under the weight.

Instead you may want to invest in an external hard drive. These come in a variety of sizes and port options. Multimedia creators use the phrase “working off of an external” to describe storing all of their projects files on this hard drive. This method also makes it easier to collaborate with teammates on account of how easy it is to share the drive.

Second, video editing programs are very particular about where you keep your files. If you don’t stick to the original file structure, you may find yourself quickly buried in error messages.

On your external hard drive, you should create a separate top-level folder for each project. Within said folder you should have a prescribed set of “buckets” to store your video footage, audio, design assets, and anything else.

Whenever you import footage from your camera, place it in the footage folder on your hard drive.

For both the project folders and your editing files, it’s best to follow a consistent naming structure, such as the common YRMODA (Year, Month, Day) structure. In example say you made a video about kitchen hacks on April 30th 2017 you would name it “170430_Kitchen_Hacks”.

Even with a perfectly organized external hard drive, you’re not necessarily out of the woods. You need to backup your files, and maybe even backup your backups. It’s not uncommon to have multiple external hard drives, one for everyday work, another for backups, and a third for more backups.

Step 7. Editing And Editing Tools.

Now that you have your footage. Congratulations… your halfway there.

Next we need to talk about editing. We understand that editing can be confusing. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed at first especially when you see the software’s price tags. It’s a good thing that there are many options for video editing based on your skill level, operating system, and budget. There are even free programs and mobile apps, let’s go over a few options.

Intermediate- Apple iMovie.

iMovie is Apple’s video editing software. Compatible with Mac and other iOS devices, iMovie is simple, user friendly, and free on all Apple products. It allows you to create and edit your videos by cutting together clips, adding titles, music, sound effects, basic color correlation, filters, and special effects.

This program even provides helpful templates that simplify the editing process. It supports high-quality video clips such as 4K video footage and makes it easy to share your work directly to a video hosting platform. Having only limited access to advanced color correction and editing features means that it isn’t commonly used by professionals, however for people just starting out it is still a great option.

Advanced- Adobe Premiere Pro.

A leading video editing software used by both professionals and amateurs alike. With a customizable interface and numerous advanced editing tools, Adobe Premiere Pro is often called the industry standard for video editing and has been used to edit major Hollywood movies.

Premiere makes it easy to collaborate with other editors, organize your materials, and sync with other programs in the Adobe suite like After Effects, and Photoshop. It supports high-quality footage, as well as advanced color correction, and grading tools that set it apart from the cheaper and free options.

The one downside however would be the cost. A year long subscription to the latest Premiere Pro CC comes in right around $240. If you’re new to video editing, you may want to experiment with a cheaper option before investing in Premiere Pro.

Step 8. Choosing Music.

Chances are that the first thing that comes to mind when you think about video, is the footage itself. However while it is important to concentrate on your video footage, you can’t forget to factor in the music to your overall plan and budget.

Music is a powerful tool that can alter your video’s mood and tone, choosing the right music often makes the difference between an amateur project and a professional piece of content. When utilized correctly, it can help keep your viewer’s attention, evoke emotions, and define your overall editing style.

Before you begin filming, set a music budget and research your local copyright laws. Copyright laws can be difficult to decipher, especially when you’re dealing with digital content. The bottom line is, most music isn’t free. If you use another artist’s music without permission or proper licensing, you risk not only video removal but legal action. In order to avoid copyright infringement, you’ll need to find royalty free music or pay a composer to create an original score. 

Royalty free songs aren’t free, they’re quality songs available for a flat fee. This means that you don’t have to worry about paying any additional licensing fees or royalties in the future. Youtube, Pond5, and  PremiumBeat are all great sites for finding royalty free music.

Next you’ll want to consider you’re audience and the overall mood for your production. Are you targeting a small audience that would appreciate the newest, underground hip hop track, or do you need something that would appeal to many demographics? Is what you’re creating an upbeat event recap, or a practical product tutorial? Make sure to choose the music that best fits and enhances the overall tone of your video.

You’ll also need to consider the purpose of your music, do you just need background music, or something with some real impact? Will you be narrating or speaking in the video? If so, make sure your music doesn’t get in the way of your content. Sometimes the best music is the music that you don’t even remember.

Once you’ve determined the type of music you need, it’s time to start analyzing potential songs. Consider the pacing of the song, songs with a steady rhythm are easy to change to suit your video style.  Maybe you were hoping to include your favorite top 40 hit? Popular radio songs are typically structured in 4-5 parts and can be rather difficult to transition. Try to choose simpler songs that are easy to loop.

If you’re looking for an instrumental song, be sure to find something that was recorded with real instruments and not digital samples as these can make your video sound unprofessional and outdated.

Finally you should consider adding intro and outro music to your videos. Otherwise known as bookends intro and outro music can serve as a kind of theme for your content. These are a great option, especially if you don’t need music throughout the whole video. Bookend music can help set the tone for your video, naturally split your content into chapters, and leave your viewers feeling they had a complete experience.

While some videos feel unfinished without background music, others just need a few tunes to tie the project together. Try looking at other videos that have a similar style and see how they utilize music.

Step 9. Recording Voice Over.

Now that you have both your footage and music, let’s take a moment to go over voice overs. A voice over is the separate video narration that’s not spoken by the speaker on camera. Voice overs are an effective tool that can help make your content more relatable, emotional, and fluid.

It’s important that you remember video audio is just as important as video visuals. The good news is that you don’t have to hire a professional to record a great voice over. Let me give you a few tips to capturing audio on a budget.

* Find A Location.

Decide on the spot you wish to record. If you can’t go to a professional studio, try instead to find a quiet room away from distracting external sounds such as, sirens, doors opening and closing, and people talking on the phone. Read your script aloud, while paying attention to the room’s acoustics. If your voice sounds muffled or echoes, consider moving to a different room, or filling the room with some furniture.

* Prepare.

Remember that practice makes perfect. Before recording read through your script a few times and take note of any difficult pauses, transitions, and words. On the big day, make sure to stay hydrated, and avoid wearing noisy clothing or jewelry. Also use a stand, laptop, or teleprompter while recording so you aren’t rustling through a printed script.

* Test And Listen.

If you think that you’ll be able to record the perfect voice over in just one take, then I have some bad news for you. Invest in a good pair of headphones and keep an eye on your audio quality throughout the recording process. It’s easier to get a new take of audio than trying to fix it during the editing process. We recommend running through your script a few times, especially the first few paragraphs, to ensure that your voice is fully warmed up. If you hear any popping or hissing noises coming from the mic, try standing further back or invest in a pop filter.

* Relax.

Read slowly, pause, and take breaks while recording your voice over. Sometimes all it takes is a sip of water to get back on track.

Step 10. Hosting Your Video.

Now that you’ve got everything ready it’s time to publish your video. Once online your audience can view, share, and engage with your video. There are multiple options for hosting your videos online, lets take some time to go over some of the best ones.

YouTube.

If you ask your friends which online video platform they use, the answer you’re most likely to hear is YouTube. YouTube is the largest video hosting platform, second largest search engine platform, and the third most visited website in the world. Over five billion videos are watched on YouTube everyday, and it’s free to upload to the site.

Not only does it have a massive audience, YouTube also offers several features that make the platform a good option for hosting your video. On account of the fact that YouTube videos are hosted on individual channels, the platform allows you to build a dedicated audience of subscribers. Users who follow your channel are also more likely to see any additional videos you upload.

Within the channel itself, you are able to organize your videos into playlists, making it easier for your audience to search within your content. From a social standpoint, the platform allows users to interact by liking and commenting on videos, providing more chances to interact with your audience. The platform also offers a variety of advertising options for more sophisticated targeting.

While there are plenty of benefits to YouTube, there are several downsides to the platform, while video ads can be a great tool for promoting your own content, the number of ads on the platform from other advertisers can detract from your viewer’s experience.

YouTube is also highly addicting, with 83% of viewers preferring YouTube over any other platform. Once viewers are on the platform they usually stick around to watch another video… or much more. This makes it difficult to drive traffic back towards your site from the platform. However despite these barriers, YouTube is a great platform for hosting videos and growing your audience.

Vimeo.

Vimeo is the world’s second largest video hosting platform, and while the audience for the platform is significantly smaller than YouTube’s, there are still many benefits that make it a favorite for content creators and viewers everywhere.

Chief among these is a simpler, cleaner, user interface that makes it easier to navigate the platform. Unlike YouTube the ads on Vimeo are very limited, making for less distractions to your viewers.

Videos on Vimeo also tend to be higher quality than the ones on YouTube, and the audience on the platform is more likely to be professional.

Vimeo offers a few premium account options to better suit businesses. Premium accounts provide additional storage, advanced analytics, customer support, player customization, access to lead generation tools, and much more. In addition to premium accounts, Vimeo also partners with businesses to produce quality marketing content.

If what you need is to showcase high quality, artistic content, Vimeo might just be the platform for you. It’s engaged audience and beautiful aesthetic make it a great place to host creative videos. On the other hand if you choose to focus on quantity over quality you may want to look into other options.

Vidyard.

Unlike the others Vidyard is a video hosting platform built specifically for businesses. It isn’t just another option to store and manage videos, it allows you to become a fully video enabled business.

Nowadays posting videos to YouTube isn’t enough. You need channel specific video content for Facebook and Instagram, not to mention for your own website. This is where Vidyard comes in the platform allows you to publish and update each of these places from a single location.

From this portal you’ll discover all sorts of viewer insights. Find the type of content your audience likes and how they watch their videos. Then, channel those insights directly into your marketing automation software or CRM.

One of the coolest features of Vidyard is the ability to personalize videos with the viewer’s name or company directly in the video design. This is a creative addition as you begin working video into your marketing and sales strategies.

Now that you’ve got everything ready it’s time to publish your video. Once online your audience can view, share, and engage with your video. There are multiple options for hosting your videos online, lets take some time to go over some of the best ones.

YouTube.

If you ask your friends which online video platform they use, the answer you’re most likely to hear is YouTube. YouTube is the largest video hosting platform, second largest search engine platform, and the third most visited website in the world. Over five billion videos are watched on YouTube everyday, and it’s free to upload to the site.

Not only does it have a massive audience, YouTube also offers several features that make the platform a good option for hosting your video. On account of the fact that YouTube videos are hosted on individual channels, the platform allows you to build a dedicated audience of subscribers. Users who follow your channel are also more likely to see any additional videos you upload.

Within the channel itself, you are able to organize your videos into playlists, making it easier for your audience to search within your content. From a social standpoint, the platform allows users to interact by liking and commenting on videos, providing more chances to interact with your audience. The platform also offers a variety of advertising options for more sophisticated targeting.

While there are plenty of benefits to YouTube, there are several downsides to the platform, while video ads can be a great tool for promoting your own content, the number of ads on the platform from other advertisers can detract from your viewer’s experience.

YouTube is also highly addicting, with 83% of viewers preferring YouTube over any other platform. Once viewers are on the platform they usually stick around to watch another video… or much more. This makes it difficult to drive traffic back towards your site from the platform. However despite these barriers, YouTube is a great platform for hosting videos and growing your audience.

Vimeo.

Vimeo is the world’s second largest video hosting platform, and while the audience for the platform is significantly smaller than YouTube’s, there are still many benefits that make it a favorite for content creators and viewers everywhere.

Chief among these is a simpler, cleaner, user interface that makes it easier to navigate the platform. Unlike YouTube the ads on Vimeo are very limited, making for less distractions to your viewers.

Videos on Vimeo also tend to be higher quality than the ones on YouTube, and the audience on the platform is more likely to be professional.

Vimeo offers a few premium account options to better suit businesses. Premium accounts provide additional storage, advanced analytics, customer support, player customization, access to lead generation tools, and much more. In addition to premium accounts, Vimeo also partners with businesses to produce quality marketing content.

If what you need is to showcase high quality, artistic content, Vimeo might just be the platform for you. It’s engaged audience and beautiful aesthetic make it a great place to host creative videos. On the other hand if you choose to focus on quantity over quality you may want to look into other options.

Vidyard.

Unlike the others Vidyard is a video hosting platform built specifically for businesses. It isn’t just another option to store and manage videos, it allows you to become a fully video enabled business.

Nowadays posting videos to YouTube isn’t enough. You need channel specific video content for Facebook and Instagram, not to mention for your own website. This is where Vidyard comes in the platform allows you to publish and update each of these places from a single location.

From this portal you’ll discover all sorts of viewer insights. Find the type of content your audience likes and how they watch their videos. Then, channel those insights directly into your marketing automation software or CRM.

One of the coolest features of Vidyard is the ability to personalize videos with the viewer’s name or company directly in the video design. This is a creative addition as you begin working video into your marketing and sales strategies.

How To Use Throughout The Fly Wheel.


It happens too often, companies jump at the opportunities to create their first video. They end up spending a ton of money on an explainer video for their homepage, but as soon as the project is complete, all intents of future projects screech to a halt.

Then there are the companies that keep churning out videos, but since they’ve only been replicating fads they’ve seen, their video’s hardly consider their audience’s challenges or habits.

When you take into account the time, money, and resources involved, you can’t let you’re video marketing plan revolve around some kind of impulsive guessing game. Instead, you need to create a comprehensive video marketing strategy that applies to every facet of your flywheel. This means taking into account the inbound methodology.

The inbound methodology is the marketing and sales approach focused on attracting customers through content and interactions that are relevant and helpful. Each video you make needs to acknowledge your audiences problems and offer a solution. Looking at the full picture, this content will guide the consumers through the journey of becoming aware of, evaluating, and purchasing your product or service.

Now in the following sections, we will go over the types of videos you should create for each stage of the inbound methodology. (Attract, Engage, Delight.) Start with planning at least two videos for each, remember to include calls-to-action to help lead your audience through their purchase journey and into the role of promoter. As you proceed you can improve based on the conversion rates and the content gaps you discover.

Attract.

The first step to the inbound methodology focuses on turning strangers into visitors. Consumers at this stage are identifying their challenges and deciding whether or not they should seek out a solution. This means the videos you create should empathize with their problems and introduce a possible solution in the form of a product or service.

The ultimate goal of this kind of video is to expand reach and build trust. Since what you need is for the video to be shareable it may become more entertaining and emotion evoking than educational. However, you should still be sure to provide enough information to associate yourself as an authority on the topic.

For attract videos it’s best to avoid speaking too much about your product. Instead, let your brand values and personality be your guide. Finally be sure to remember that these videos can live on a variety of channels, so you’ll need differing strategies for each.

Examples of attract videos would be things such as short social videos that show off your brands personality, thought leadership videos that establish you as a source of industry news and insight, brand films that share your values or mission, or how-to videos that provide relevant tips for solving your audiences problems.

Engage.

With video marketing the engage point is split between both converting, and closing.

* Convert.

Now that you’ve attracted both video viewers and website visitors, the next step is to convert these visitors into leads. The main way of doing this is to find a way to collect some sort of contact information, such as through a form. Video can aid in this process by visualizing a solution to the buyer’s problem, either before the landing page or as the offer itself.

Webinars filled with tactical advice, product demos sent via email, landing page promotional videos, case studies, or even more detailed how-to-videos are examples of convert videos.

* Close.

Now that you’ve converted the right visitors into leads, it’s time to close these leads into customers. Strangely as important a stage as this is, it is often overlooked by marketers and salespeople.

Once they’ve reached this point the consumer is weighing their options and deciding on the purchase. As such the goal of this kind of video is to make your audience visualize themselves using your product or service, and excelling with it. There is a reason why 4X as many customers would rather watch a video about a product than read about it. Videos are able to display functionality and leverage emotions in a way simple product descriptions never could.

A good example of close videos would be customer testimonials with relatable stories, in-depth product demos, culture videos that sell viewers on your quality of service, or even personalized videos that explain exactly how your product could help them.

* Delight.

While a purchase may have already been made, there is still plenty that video can do to leverage the post-conversion stage of your flywheel. During the delight stage of the inbound methodology your goal will be to continue providing remarkable content to users that makes their interaction with your product or service as incredible as possible. It also helps increase the chance that they’ll tell their connections about their experience or up-sell themselves. So the goal for this type of video would be to encourage your customers to embrace your brand and become brand evangelists.

The first opportunity to delight your consumer is directly after purchase. Maybe you should send them a thank you video to welcome into the community or an on-boarding video to get them rolling with their new purchase. Then you can build out a library of educational courses or product training videos to cater to consumers who prefer self-service or simply want to expand their expertise.

Defining Your Goals And Analyzing Results.

Now that you’ve learned how to create a video and where to host it, you probably think that you’re ready to get started. Unfortunately you’re not. Before you really get started, you need to define your video goals and identify the best metrics for determining whether you’ve accomplished those goals.

Before you launch any kind of marketing campaign, it’s important to determine your primary video goal. This could range from increasing brand awareness, engagement, or conversions for a free trial. Regardless it’s crucial that you only pick out one or two goals for each video. If you try anymore than that the video could come out unfocused, making it difficult for viewers to determine what they should do next.

When coming up with your goals, be sure to keep your buyer persona and target audience in mind. How old are they? Where do they live? What are their interests? How do they typically consume media? What stage of the buyer’s journey are they in?

All of these questions can help you determine what type of video you should make and where you should post it.

Now lets talk about some metrics. Understanding these will equip you to define and measure the success of your set goals. When you post a video online, it’s easy to get obsessed with one metric, the view count. However while view count can be an important metric, there are plenty of others that might be more relevant to your campaign.

Lets go over a few of the more popular metrics you’ll see when you publish and track a video.

* View Count.

View count refers to the number of times your video has been viewer, it is also sometimes referred to as reach. This is a great metric to use if your goal is to increase brand awareness, and have your content seen by as many people as possible. However remember that every video hosting platform measures a view differently.

* Play Rate.

Play rate is the percentage of people who’ve played your video divided by the number of impressions it received. This metric is good for determining how relevant or appealing your video is to your audience. If a lot of people are viewing your video but few play it, it may be worth it to optimize your content.

* Social Sharing And Comments.

If you spend time on social media, you are more than likely familiar with sharing and commenting. Shares and comments are good indicators of how relevant your content is with your target audience. If a viewer watches your video and takes the time to share it, you might just have created a quality piece of content. The great thing about social shares is that the more times they’re shared the more times they’ll be viewed, which makes them a great metric to track if your goal is to reach a lot of people.

* Video Completions.

If you take the time to make a video, you’d probably want people to watch it all the way through. That is what video completion tracks, the number of times a video has been viewed in its entirety. In most cases this metric is more reliable than view count to determine your video’s success.

* Completion Rate.

The completion rate is the number of times people completed your video divided by the number of people who played it. Completion rate and other engagement metrics are a great way to gauge a viewer’s reaction to your video. If you have a low completion rate, this could be a sign that your video’s content isn’t resonating with your target audience.

* Click-Through Rate.

The click-through rate, or CTR is the number of times your call-to-action, of CTA is clicked divided by the number of times it’s viewed. CTR is one of the best indicators to how effective your video is at encouraging people to take a desired action, if the number is low think about revising your CTA.

* Conversion Rate.

The number of times visitors completed your desired action, divided by the number of clicks on your CTA. If your goal is to have your viewers complete an action like signing up for a free trial, try adding a video to your landing page to see if the conversion rate increases.

* Bounce Rate And Time-On-Page.

If your thinking about adding a video to your web page, you should check out the page’s bounce rate first, as well as the amount of time people spend on the page before you add the video. Check the metrics after you add the video as well and see if they’ve changed at all.

In Conclusion.

If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed now, don’t be concerned you’re not the only one. Video editing and marketing can seem complicated at first, but with some practice and patience, high quality content that is unique to your brand is just over the horizon.

71% of consumers are watching more video online than they were a year ago, and brands can no longer ignore their popularity. So pick up a camera, start filming, and watch your engagement levels skyrocket. It’s time to take that first big step towards video marketing, and make it a part of your marketing strategy.











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